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Full text of "Announcement"

c 




28th annual 



ANNOUNCEMENT 




:0F 



Hillsdale College, 




t^r" {i^. 



FEB i i^w 



HILLSDALE, ^ MICHIGAN 



1884-5- 




IIILLSDALE, MICH. : 

STANDARD PRINT, 64 HOWELL STREET, 
1 884. 




AVERAGE OF OVER 500 STUDENTS YEARLY 
DURING ENTIRE COLLEGE HISTORY. 

The College year of 18S4-5 will open September 3. We ?encl this announce- 
ment to you as an aid in your choice of a scliool. and respectfully request you 
to use it as a means of inducing others to secure a college education In com- 
parison of schools, please notice the following points: 

Range of Instkuction.— By its variety of departments Hillsdale College 
affords superior advantages to that larire class of students Avho, while pursu- 
ing a definite course desire to take parts of others. The departments are: 
Literary, with four courses ; Theological, with two courses ; Corauiercial ; 
Telegraphic ; Music ; Art. Lectures in each department are open to students 
in all others. The number of instructors suggests the extent and variety of 
teaching. The PreparaJory' Courses for the Classical. Philosophical and Scien- 
tific Courses are three, two and one years, respectively, English branches being 
taught each term. 

Applied Instruction. — Field Practice in Surveying is given each spring. 
The lines of the Western Union Telegrai)h Company ])ass through the Tele- 
graphic room, thus affordimj rare Opporturities for practice to students in that 
department who, in addiiion, transact the commercial business of the company 
in the city. Drawing and Painting from Nature is a point of sj^ecial advantage 
in the department of Art. Lectures on Teaching are given in the fall to the 
Normal class, and studies are arranged, for the same term, with special refer- 
ence to the wants of the large number who will teach in the winter. There is 
a constant demand for our students as teachers. 

It becomes the pleasant duly of the college to call attention to the radical 
change it has made, during the past year, in its method of teaching the life 
studies. Botony. Zoology and Fluman Physiology. Through the generosity of 
friends of the college, it now possesses a finely equipped biological laboratory, 
This laboratory includes in its equipment 14 Bausch and Lomb Compond Micro- 
scopes, with their attachments and a lartie supply of dissecting apparatus. 
Each student in these important branches is row required to study Nature by 
the aid of these instruments and under the special direction of the professor in 
that department. 

The CHiasTiA.N Influence of the school is a gratifying feature. The Y. 
M. C. A. of the faculty and students, is in a flourishing condition and conducts 
the religious meetings in its hall where many conversions are witnessed. While 
the school is under denominational control, the opinions of individual students 
and the choice of churches, are free from embarrassment or restraint. Other 
denominations are large patrons of the school, their membership among the 
students being fully equal in the aggregate to that of the Free Bapti.-ts. 

Expenses.— Since the printing of this circular the Board of Trustees has 
changed the Incidental Expenses for gentltmen to fS 00 per term, and for 
ladies to -ta 00 pei teruL See page 33. 

General.— The Recitation Rooms arc spaciou-s and well lighted- Four of 
the five unildings are new, and the group is located upon high gnmnd, on a 
beautiful t-ile, where the general health is specially good. Sui)crior advantam's 
are afforded by the Library, Reading Room, Literary and .Musical Societies. The 
correspondence and the number of rooms already taken, imint to an increased 
atten'dance over 18H3-4, which was among the largest in the history of the 
school.— For further information with reference to courses and studies the 
President should be written, and for catalogues a Idress, 

C. B. MILLS, Secretary. 



28th annual 
ANNOUNCEMENT 



:0F 



iLLSDALE College, 




HILLSDALE. MICHIGAN. 



1883-4. 



HILLSDALE, MICH.: 

STANDARD BOOK AND JOB PRINTING HOUSE. 

1883. 



FACULTY, 



REV. DeWITT CLINTON DUEGIN, D.D., Pkesident, 

Professor of Mental, Moral and Political Philosophy. 
No. 9 College Hall. 95 Hillsdale St., N, 



REV. RANSOM DUNN, D.D., 

Professor Emeritus of Systematic and Pastoral Theology. 

Salem, Neb. 



DANIEL MOSES FISK, A.M., 

Professor of Chemistry, Biology and Geology. 
No. 15 Knowlton Hall. 9 (Jollege St., W. 



REY. JOHN SCOTT COPP, A.M., 

Alumni Professor of Logic, Belles-lettres and German. 
No. 16 Knowlton Hall. 7 College St., E. 



ARTHUR EDWIN HAYNES, M. Ph., 

Fowler Professor of Mathematics and Physics. 

No. 7 College Hall. 64 West St., N. 



ALEXANDER CAMPBELL RIDEOUT, LL.D., 

Principal of Commercial Department and Professor of Political Economy. 
Office, Griffin Hall. 9 Griffin Hall. 



WARREN ALLEN DRAKE, A.M., 

Professor of Commercial Law, Book keeping and Penmanship. 
No. 2 Griffin Hall. Cor. Salem and State Sts., E 



GEORGE BALTHAZAR GARDNER, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 
No. 25 Fine Arts Hall. 3 MoLellan St., N. 



MELYILLE WARREN CHASE, 

Professor of Instrumental and Vocal Music. 
No. 27 Fine Arts Hall. 8 Mechanic St., W. 



KINGSBURY BACIIELDER, A.M., 

Waldron Professor of the Latin Language and Literature. 
No. 5 College Hall. 104 Hillsdale St., N. 



JAMES F. PARSONS, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 
No. 22 Fine Akts Hall. 99 Hillsdale St., N. 



IIEV. CHARLES I). DUDLEY, A.M., 

Burr Professor of Systematic Theology. 
10 College Hall. 100 Hillsdale St., N. 



REV. ASHMARr T. SALLEY, A.M., 

Professor of Sacred Literature. 
10 C01.LEGE Hall. 100 Hillsdale St., N. 



MISS CASSIE ALDA REAMER, 

Principal of the Ladies' Department and Professor in French and History. 

No. 21 Fine Arts Hall. U East Hall. 



FRANK SMITH, 

Tutor in Mathematics. 



CLARK LINCOLN HERRON, 

Tutor in Mathematics. 



ALEXANDER HAMILTON HILLER, 

Tutor in Grammar. 



STEPHEN BENJAMIN HARVEY, 

Tutor in German. 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 



Rev. DeAVitt C. Duhgin, D.D., Chairman. 

Hon. Chakles B. Mills. A.M.. Secretarv and Treasurer 



Term Expires June, 1 88A. 
Hon. Benjamin F. McKenney, Wisconsin. 
Rev. DeWitt C. Dukgin, D.D., Hillsdale. 
Caleb.C. Johnson, M.D., Hillsdale. 
Elon G. Reynolds, A.M., Hillsdale. 

Col. Fkedekiok M. Hglloway, Hillsdale. 
Leonakd Olney, Hillsdale. 

Hon. David Emery, Titiisville, Penn. 



Term Expires June, 1 885. 

Hon. John P. Cook, Hillsdale. 

Rev. James B. Drew, A.M., Paw Paw. 

Rev. Isaac D. Stewart, A.M., Dovei', N. H. 
Rev. Ranson Dunn, D.D., Hillsdale. 
Hon. Ezra L. Koon, Hillsdale. 
Hugh Cook. Hillsdale. 

Rev. Jerome Higbee, A.M., Catarau^ns, N. Y. 



Term Expires June, 1 886. 
Rev. George R. Holt, B. D., Jackson. 

Hon. John C Patterson, A.M., Marshall. 
Hon. Martin P. Stockwell, Dover. 
Hon. John S. Hart, Racine, Wis. 

Prot». J. William Mauck, Chicajro, 111. 
Capt. Nicholas Vineyard, Hillsdale. 

Rev. Charles N. Waldron, D.D., Detroit. 



Term Expires June, f 887. 

Charles P Griffin Chicago, 111. 

Jonathan Kitchen, Springfield, Ohio. 
Col. Frederick Fowler, Reading. 
Barber Perkins, Coldwaier. 
Dan M. Harvey, New burg. 

Rev. George H. Ball, D.D.. Buffalo, >J. Y 
Hon. B, F. Haley, Newniarket, N. H. 



Term Expires June, 1888. 

Hon. AVilliam E. Ambler, A.M., Pentwater. 
Hon. Oscar A. Janes, M.S., Hillsdale. 
Hon. Charles T. Mitchell, Hillsdale. 
O. C. AViiitney, MS., Niciiolson,Pa. 
Rev. David L. Rice, Pierpont, O. 

Hon. Charles W. Mills, A.M., Hillsdale. 
James W. Winsor, Hillsdale. 



PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEE, 



I). W. C. DunGiN, ChairlDJin. 
Cii.vin.K8 T. Mitchell, Ezra L. Koon, 

CiiAHLEsN Waldron, Elon G. Keynolds, 

FIucJH Cook, Oscar A. Janes, 

James W. >Vi\sor, John P. Cook.' 

Caleb C. Johnson, 

Elon C Keynolds, 

AUDITOR. 



Rev. John S. Copp, 

LIBRARIAN. 

Herbekt'H. Rood, 
assistant librarian. 



THEOLOGICAL ADVISORY BOARD, 



D. ^y. C. Durgin, D.D., President. 
Rev. G. R. Holt, B.D., Jackson. 

A. E. Wilson, Lansinir. « 

Rev. G. H. Ball, D.D., Buffalo, K Y. 
Rev. O. E. Baker, Marion, Oliio. 

Rev. T H. Dkake, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. D. L. Rice, Pierpont, Ohio. 

Rev. John Ashley, Hillsdale. 

Rev. a. a. Smith, Minneapolis, Minn. 



ABBREVIATIONS. 

WITH THE NUMBER OP PUBLIC ROOMS. 

C. — College Hall. Rooms numbered I to XUI. 

G.— Griffin Hall. " XXVH to XXX. 

K.— Knowlton Hall. " XIV to XIX. 

F.— FiN^ Arts Hall. " XX to XXVT. 

E.— East Hall. '' XXXI to XXXIV. 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

The regular exarniiiations for admission to the College for 
1884 will begin at 9 o'clock, September 8th, at the Presiclent^s 
room. Candidates for the Freshman Class will be examined in 
the studies required for that year, except those for whicli certifi- 
cates of examination shall be presented from the Hillsdale High 
School; from the schools whose certificates are accepted at the 
State University ; from the New York State Regents ; and from 
other schools and boards whose courses ot study and methods of 
instruction have been examined and approved by the Faculty. 
Candidates for advanced standing will be examined m the studies 
required for admission to the year which they desire to enter. 



I. CLASSICAL COURSE. 

The studies required for the Freshman Class are: The 
common English branches ; Latin Grammar, including Prosody ; 
Caesar, four books; Cicero, six orations; Virgil's ^neid, six 
books ; Latin Prose Composition ; Greek Grammar and Lessons ; 
Xenophon's Anabasis, three books; Greek Prose Composition; 
Algebra, to Part HI., Olney's Univ. ; Plane Geometry ; Compo- 
sition and Rhetoric; United States History; Ancient History: 
and atural Philosophy. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

f Livy. 
T? » T T T,,^ o,T J Greek Selections — Boise and Freemen. 
t ALL ILKM.... i History of GvGece-^mith. 

I Solid Geometry — Olney. 

( De Amicitia. 
u/TTVTrrcw TiruTtr J Latiu Prosc Composltiou — Harkness. 
wiisiLR iLKM. <i^ Gpeek Selections— ^0/56 a^^ -Freemen. 

I, University Algebra, Part HI. — Olney. 

C Horace. 
Sphing Term.. \ (Treek Selections — Boise m^d Freemen. 
y Trigonometry — Olney. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

( Antigone — Woolsey. 
Fall Term... «j Mechanics — Peck. 

\^ Inorganic Chemistry — Syllabus. 

( Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. 
WiNTKR Term. «( Vhy HicH—Qanot. 

[ Mineral ChGunaivy— Syllabus and Lectures. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



f Demosthenes — D^Ooye. 
Spring Term.. < Astronomy — SnelVs Olmsted. 

\ Or<i:iuic Chemistry — Syllabus and Lectures. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

{ Juvenal — Elective lot'th General Geometry or 

I German or French. 

' Rhetoric— ///^Z. 

1 Louie — Jevons. 

I Kiiiilish Literature. 

I, Comparative Zoology— Or^o??. {Packard.) 



Fall Term 



f Plato, Apologia — Elective with Calculus or 
I j German and French. 

.,r rn ) Logic; — Jevons. 

WxSTFAi lEHM. ;K|,- t„,i<,_^,a. 

I .'English Literature. 

l^sBiology, Human Physiology — Lecim^es. 

( Gorgias — Elective with Calculus or German or 

I French. 

} Logic — Jevons. 

\ Rhtitovic— Hill. 

{ English Literature. 

i. Geology — Ee Conte. 

SENIOR YEAR. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term 



Winter Term, 



Spring Term 



f Intellectual Philosophy — Pointer. 
<J Evidences of Christianity — Hopkins. 
[ Mediaeval History — Lectures. 

( Modern History — Lectures. 

I Butler's Analogy — Malcom. (One-half term.) 

' /Esthetics — Bascom. ( One-half term.) 



j Political Economy — Perry. 
I Speculative Philosophy — . 



IV I 



'th Modern History 



Lectures. Elective 



Moral Philosophy — Hopkins. 
Philology — Whitney. 
{ United States Consiitulion — Andreivs. 



II. PHILOSOPHICAL COURSE. 

The studies required for the Freshman Class are : The com- 
mon English branches; Latin Grammar; Cassar, four books; 
Cicero, two orations; Latin Prose Composition; Algebra, to 
Part HI., Olney's Univ.; Plane Geometry; Conjposition and 
Khetoric; Botany; U. S. History ; Ancient Histoi-y; and Natu- 
ral Philosophy. Instead of Latin here required, the student 
may take the Green required for admission to the Freshman Year 
of the Classical Course. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

f Cicero or Greek Selections 

! Solid Geometry — Olney. 

\ French Grammar — Elective with Latin or 

y Greek. 

( Virg-il or Greek Selections. 

j Latin Prose Composition — Jones. 

\ University Ali^ebra. Pan 1I[. — Clney. 

y French or Latin or Greek. 

f Yirgil or Greek Selections. 

l^ Trigonometry — Olney. 

y French or Latin or Greek. 



F ALL TeKM 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term. 



Fall Term. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

General Geometry — Olney. 
Fall Term. . . <i Inorganic Chemistry — Syllabus. 

Whitney's German Grammar, Latin or Greek. 

( Calculus — Olney. 
Winter Term \ Mineralogy— Xec^^^re5. 
wiNiEK lERM. <; ^y,^^j^(,^.Js German Reader, Latin or Greek. 

I, Laboratory Practice — Optional. 

( Calculus — Olney. 
Spring Term.. { Organic Chemistry — Lectures. 
[ Schiller's Tell — Latin or Greek. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

f Rhetoi-ic— ^^7Z. 

English Literature. 

Logic — Jevons. 

Mechanics — Peck. 
i Comparative Zoology — Or ton {Packard.) 
\ Goethe's Goelz— Elective with Latin or Greek 
f Logic — Jevons. 
I English Literature, 
Winter Term. { Rhetoric — Hill. 
I Physics — Ganot. 
\^ Human Physiology — Lectures. 

( Logic — Jevons. 
I Rhetoric — ITitl. 
Spring Term.. { EnVlish Literature. 

I Astronomy — SneWs Olmsted. 
\^ Geology — Le Conte. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

f Intellectual Philosophy — Porter. 
\ Evidences of Christianity — Hopkins. 
\^ Mediaeval History — Lectures. 

^"Esthetics — Bascom. 
Butl(!r's Analogy — Malcom. 
Politi(;al I^]conon)y — Perry. 
Modern 1 1 isiory — Lectures. 
Speculative Philosophy — Lectures. Elective 
with Modern History. 



Fall Term, 



Winter Term. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



[ Moral Piiilosophy — Hopkins. 
SiMMNc; TKinp. . <{ l*liil()K»,i:v — Whitney. 

[^ United Stales Consiitulioii — Andretvs. 



III. SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Candidates tor the Freshman Chiss are exannined in the coin- 
nion English branches; one year of Latin or Greek; Composi- 
tion and Khetoric ; Natural Philosophy ; Botany; U. S. History ; 
and First Principles of Algebra. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

[ French Grammar — Keetels. 
Fall Term . <^ Chemistry — Lectures. 

\^ University Algebra, Part I. — Olney. 

( French — KeeteVs Reader. 
WivTKRTFRAr J Mineralogy— Xec^i^m"?. 
w iNTLK lEKM. <; University Algebra, Part II.— Olney. 

[^ Laboratory Practice — Olney. 

[ Racine — Fasquelle. 
Spuing Term. . { Organic Chemistry — Lectures. 
y Plane Geometry — Olney. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

( German Grammar — Wliitney. 
F Ti Ter \ '^^^^^©y — Orton {Packard.) 

^ ' ' " ' \ Dissections — Mivart, Straus -Durckheim. 

{ Solid Geometry — Olney. 

f Human Physiology — T^ectures. 
AViNTER Term. <J German Readei- — Whitney. 
\ Algebra. Part \\\— Olney. 

f TaW— Schiller. 
I Geology — Xe Conte. 
Spring Term.. \ Trigonometry — Olney. 

j Botany — Gray (Bessey.) 
\^ Microscopy. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

[ R\wiovm—m/l. 
I Enulish Literature. 
FallTekm... ^ Logic — Jevo7is. 

! Mediaeval History — Lectures. 

[ General Geometry, or Goethe's Goetz. 

[ Logic — Jevons. 
I Rhetoric — Hill. 
Winter Term. { English Literature. 

I Modern History — Lectures. 

t Calculus, or Schiller's Historical Sketches 



10 COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

( English Literature. 
I Logic — Jevons. 
Spring Term.. { Rhetoric — Hill. 

United States Constitution — And^^ews. 

Calculus, or Schiller's Yungfrau von Orleans. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

( Mental Philosophy — Porter. 
Tr« X rr.,„,, J Evidences of Christianitv — Hopkins. 
Fall Tlrm... { Mechanics-Pec/.. 

l^ German Seminary— Optional. 

( Butler's Analogy — Malcom. 
I Political Economy — Perry. 
Winter Term. \ Physics — Ganot. 

Speculative Philosophy — Lectures. 
\ German Seminary — Optional. 

( Moral Philosophy — Hopkins. 
o rn Philologv — Whitney. 

Spring Term.. { Asivouomy-SneWs Olmsted. 

y German Seminary — Optional. 

French, German, and Junior Mathematics are elective with 
Latin and Greek, provided a second year of French or German 
be taken during the course. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations are required on the completion of every study. 
A term rank of 7 on a scale of 10 will admit one to an examina- 
tion for promotion. 




DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES. 



DESCPvlPTION OF COURSES OF STUDY. 

The science of language has revolutionized former views 
respecting Greek and Latin. These languages, once spoken by 
the most cultivated classes of Greece and Rome, are not "dead," 
but are still living in and with the most refined modern lan- 
guages. Out of Greek and Latin are made a large percentage of 
the Romance languages, half of the English language, and also, 
nearly all scientific terms, while the Germanic family of lan- 
guages are from the same original source. Hence a student of 
science or of modern languages cannot be a broad and accurate 
scholar without a knowledge of Greek and Latin. The study 
of these languages is Si^ practical as any study in scholarship. — 
These facts are recognized in this College. The following are 
some of the special features ot study and instruction in Greek 
and Latin : 

1. Reading at sight. 

2. Explanation of Greek and Latin words in English and 
in science. 

3. Influence of Greek and Latin on grammar, rhetoric, and 
literature of English. 

4. Origin and history of these languages, and their relation 
to the science of philology. 

5. Free use of black-boards in the first years of the course. 

6. Constant referring of students, in proportion to advance- 
ment, to collateral reading. 

7. Special efforts to impress advanced students with the 
richness and value of these great masterpieces as a literature. 

8. Repetition. No principle, word, or form, once learned, 
is allowed to be forgotten. By frequent re-reading, even to the 
end of the course, an acquaintance with each author is retained. 



CMEMISTRY AND NATURAL HISTORY. 

Lectures in Chemistry are given on five days of each of the 
thirty-eight weeks of the Sophomore year. A printed syllabus 
of the instruction relieves the student of the tedious labor of 



12 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



copying class-room dictation. Chemistry is tausfht both as a 
body of philosophy, of exceptional value as a disciplinary study, 
and as an investigation of phenomena embodying thought capa- 
ble of being revealed by experiment. A full line of experi- 
ments is given in an admirably constructed amphitheater, from 
the resources of a good laboratory. Special prominence is given 
to the relations of Chemistry to Biology. 

The Biological course is begun with Botany, which is taught 
in a Laboratory, with the aid of Compound Microscopes, and 
necessary apparatus for preparing Herbaria. The work is from 
the first thoroughly practical. Plants, rather than words, are 
studied. Drawing from nature, and from the microscopical field 
is required. Plant analysis, and the complete preparation and 
mounting of many dried specimens are prominent features of the 
term's work. A printed syllabus of Cryptogamic Botany ena- 
bles the class to enter a field not usually covered by the ordinary 
text books. The College has a creditable Herbarium containing 
many plants from Europe, South America, Asia, as well as 
American land plants, and a fine collection of marine algae. All 
are named, classified, and arranged in accessible cases, which are 
open daily for the use of students. 

Comparative Zoology follows Botany, and is taught by text 
book, familiar talks, and by required museum work. The 
Natural History collections are now quite extended, and con- 
stant! v increasing. 



DEPARTMENT OE^ MATHEMATICS AND PHYSICS. 

The course in Mathematics is extended, and is well calcu- 
lated to lead the student up to vigorous, independent thoui^'lit ; 
it includes besides the ordinary college course a year of the Gen- 
eral Geometry and Calculus. , 

In reading Geometry, care is taken to study not only Its logic 
but a specialty is made of another feature — a veiy important 
one, viz : the study of the beauty of correct form, on the prin- 
ciple that however well the student may be able to reason, yet 
he is not fully accomplished in this fertile science until he is able 
to represent neatly and correctly the various geometrical 
concepts. The reading of Part HI., Olney's University Geome- 
try, is optional. 

In the study of Algebi-a, carcifiil attcnlion is ]Mid to the sub- 
ject of general solutions and foiiiiulic, especially during the last 



COURSE OF STUDY. 13 

two terms ; for without the power of generalization, one can 
never become a real mathematician. During the last term much 
time is spent in studying the elementary principles of the Differ- 
ential Calculus, (as given in Part III. Olney's University Alge- 
bra), and in their direct application to the development of alge- 
braic and logarithmic functions; some time, moreover, is given 
to the subject of the Loci of Equations, as a means of illustrat- 
ing some of the more abstruse principles of the Theory of 
Equations. 

After a thorough study of the theory of Trigonometry 
(plane and spherical) and Surveying, the class is required to take 
several weeks of lield-practice on the various problems of Plane 
Trigonometry and Surveying. Each student is required to read 
his data from a fine engineer's transit, and from the field notes 
thus taken to make the necessary computations, together with a 
carefully drawn plat of each problem. In addition to the or- 
dinary class work in Mechanics, practical test problems are 
given the class from other sources than the text book used. 

Besides the regular work in Astronomy, which includes the 
theory as presented in most of our college text books, together 
with the solution of various problems in Mathematical Astron- 
omy, requiring the applications of the principles of Mechanics 
and of Spherical Trigonometry, — lectures are given during the 
term on the history of the development of this science, and upon 
Spectrum Analysis as an aid in the discovery of astronomical 
truths. Special efiTort is made in the first of these discussions to 
point out clearly the work of Ptolemy, Copernicus, Tycho 
Brahe, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Laplace, Sir W. and Sir J. Her- 
schel, and others. 

Several excellent oil paintings of astronomical phenomena, 
the " Harvard Views" (engravings) and Rutherford's celebrated 
views of the moon (photographs) are subject to the inspection of 
the class. The Department is also furnished with a first-class; 
equatorially-mounted telescope (5-in object glass) which is freely 
used, as far as praclricable, in assisting tlie student to gnin a clearer 
conception of the physical aspects of the heavenly bodies, includ- 
ing daily observations of the sun for spots, of which measure- 
ments are taken and a record is made. 

Bailey's Astral Lantern is used by the class in learning to 
trace the constellations, and for ascertaining the names of the 
stars composing them. 

In reading the General Geometry and Calculus, during the 
first part of the year, the student is required to continue the 
siudv of the Loci of Equations as begun in Higher Algebra, un- 
til he has acquired facility in discovering the locus from its 



14 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



equation, in producing and discnssing-, by both the rectilinear 
and polar methods, general and special equations of the right 
line, Conic Sections, also some of the equations of the Higher 
plane cui'ves, and the Transformation of Co-ordinates. After 
this, lie continues the development of Algebraic and Transcen- 
dental functions by the aid of tin; Differential Calculus, and the 
applications of its principles to the investigation of loci, includ- 
ing the subjects Maxima and Minima, Tangents, Normals, Sin- 
g-ular Points, Curve Tracing, Radius ot Curvature. Envelopes, 
etc., and linally makes a study of the Integ-ral Calculus and its 
applications to the Rectification of Plane Curves, the Quadrature 
• of Plane Surfaces and Surfaces of Revolution, the Cubature of 
Volumes of Revolution and. the Deduction of the Equations of 
Curves. 

The Department of Physics is well supplied with appliances 
for g-ood work, especially on the subjects of Pneumatics, Optics 
and Electricity. Many experiments are given to illustrate the 
topics under discussion. The apparatus includes two fine Air 
Pumps and the various attachments, a large Holtz Electric Ma- 
chine with an excellent set of accompinying- pieces, a lir^e size 
Crook's Ridiometer, a first class Spectroscope, etc. 

Five hours a week, of class-room work, are required in all 
these branches. 



ENGLISH AND LOGIC. 

The instruct ion in Rhetoric extends through one year. 

First Tkhm. — Choire of subject, collection and arrangement 
of material, construction and criticism of [)lans, English diction, 
construction of seniences and paragr'^iphs, figurative language, 
and criticism of style. 

SiiCoND Teum. — Pr.icticft in c^m^x^sin^- descriptive, narra- 
tive, expository, and argumentative discourses. 

Third Term. — Practice in composition continued, the study 
of mastei'pieces of Eng-lish oratory. 

A one year's couise in EnalisJi Llternture is requii-ed in ali 
the college courses. The ;?>*.s/ and second terms are occupied in 
the siudy of works belowg-ing to the old and transitional English. 
The third term is devoted to the critical study of special works, 
and spe(;ial kinds of literature. 

Lo(jic is also taught duiing the whole year. During the 
first term special attention is given to th(! theory of deductive 
and inductive reasoning-. The second and third terms are em- 
ployed in the analysis of arguni'Mitative works and the detection 
ot fallacies in the same. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 15 




THE GERMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 




The course in German occupies three years. The object is 


to enable the student, at the end of his course, to read at sight 


anv work in modern German, to converse to some extent, and to 


understand the language when spoken. 






COURSES IN GERMAN. 






Course I. 


Alphabet, reading, translating into Ger- 
man, and conversation. Articles, substan- 








tives, prepositions, auxiliary verbs, adjec- . 


!^ 


g 




tives. 


«; 
g 


^ 


Course IV 


Goethe's Goetz. — Order of words in a sen- 


u 

^ 




tence : simple, assertive, interrogative and 


^ 


i-i 




inverted; three cases of nouns (Gen. Dat. 




f 




Accu.) after verbs.— [ F7^z7?ie?/. Ex. 16-20. 




Course VII. 


German Seminary. — The work of the year 








will be concentrated on Schiller; members 








of the class will alternately interpret sec- 
tions of Piccolomini.— [ Whit. Ex, 30-36. 






Course II. 


Reading Whitney's Reader, translating 




t/5 




from English, and conversation continued. — 


N 


'A 




Regular verbs, pronouns, irregular verbs. 


►^ 
g 






{^Whitney, Ex. 1-6. 


» 


Course V. 


Schiller's Historical Sketches ; Egmont's 




> 




Leben nnd Tod, and Belagerung von Ant- 


^ 




werpen.— Prepositions, prepositional phras- 




n 




es.— [ Whitney, Ex. 21-25. 


s 


Course VIII. 


German Seminary. — Schiller: carefully 


;^ 


S 




prepared introductions and analyses of his 




Ui 




dramas and comedies. — [ Wltitney, Ex. 37- 
42. 




'/i 


Course III. 


Boisen's Gernran Prose. — Passive, reflex- 








ive, impersonal, and compound verbs, and 




conversation. — [ Whitney, Ex. 7-15. 


a 


Course VI. 


Schiller's Wilhelm Tell. — Dependent sen- 


Cb 






tences ; irregular verbs. — [ Whitney, Ex. 26- 


^ 
^ 


"^ 




29. 


c 


Course IX. 


The critical studv of Schiller's Historv ot 


& 


;^ 




the Geschichtedes Dieisigjaerigen Kriegs. — 




H 




Whitney, Ex. 43-49. 





llr-THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



TERMS OF ADMISSION. 

('niididates for acimissioii to this Dei)artnient iriiist furnish 
evidence ot good stand in<4 in some Christian church, and must 
be properly qualified to pursue the studies with profit. 

Tho«;e who have received tlie degree of A.B. will be admit- 
ted to the Full Theological Course without examination. Other 
candidates for this coui^e must g:ive evidence of proficiency in the 
following studies : Common English branches, Composition and 
Rhetoric, Natural Philosophy, Physiology, Chemistry, Geology, 
Astronomy, Logic. Rhetoric, Menthl Philosophy, Moral Philoso- 
phy, Butler's Analogy, English Literf.ture, and Greek two years. 

Those who enter the English Course nmst be prepared in 
English Grammar, Composition and Rhetoric, Geography, 
Arithmetic, and History of the United States. 

Those who have only a Common School education should 
usually spend not less than three years in preparation for tlie 
Full Theolog-ical Course. Students of the English Course may 
study the Greek and Hebrew, so far as they may be able, under 
direction ot the Faculty. 

Any |)ers<)n who doos not wish to enior either course of 
study may. on advisiim with the Faculty, pursue any studies 
taught in the school. 



COUKSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 
Fi LL Col HSE. En(;lish Cot i?sk, 



Greek E,i'e(iesi.s-. 
N(;vv Testament (Jrauimai*. 
(ireek Harmony of the (ios])els. 
The Acts and Epistles. 
HehrevK 

IIebi(!W (Grammar, and Fxeiresis 

of the Old Testament. 
Biblical Antiquities. 



Mental and Moral Philosophy. 

Logi(; and Rhetoric. 

Bull(!r's Analogy and Natural 

Theologv. 
J^^idences ot Christianity. 
English Literature. 



THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 17 

MIDDLE YEAR. 

Lectures on Systematic Theology, 

Being and Attributes of Grod. 
Authenticity and Inspiration of the Bible. 
Works of God : Angels and Men. 
Human Nature and Agency. 
Fall of Man : Depravity and Sin. 
Christ and the Atonement. 
Repentance, Faith and Prayer. 
Regeneration, Justification and Sanctification. 
Church, Sabbath, Worship, Ministry. 
Baptism and Lord's Supper. 
Resurrection and General Judgment. 
Future Rewards and Punishments. 

History of the Canon. 
Canon of the Old and New Testaments. 

Hebrew. 

Exegesis of the Old Testament twic6 a week throughout the 
vear. 



SENIOR YEAR. 
Lectures on Pastoral Theology. 

Appointment, Mission, and Qualifications of the Christian 
Minister. 

Pastoral Duties in the Study, Family, Prayer-Meetings, and 
Pulpit. 

Revivals, Special Labors, and Ecclesiastical Relations. 

Lectures on Homiletics. 
Sacred Rhetoric and Pulpit Elocution. 

Ecclesiastical History. 
Ancient, Mediaeval and Modern Church. 
History of Christian Doctrine. 
History of Christian Missions. 



GENEEAL INFORMATION. 



EXPENSE. 

Tuition Is free to all persons who are members in good 
standing in any evangelical denomination, and tuition is free to 



1 1 



18 THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 

students in other departments of the College who are prepariii*^ 
for the work of the gospel ministry. 

AID. 

Pecuniary assistance is furnished to students who are pre- 
paring for the ministry and are needy, and, so far as practicable, 
opportunities for remunerative preaching are obtained for them 
The means thus provided, together with what may be earned 
during the vacations, are usually sufficient to support the student 
through the year. 

LIBRARY. 

This department has a valuable library, especially adapted 
to its wants, and a fund for its constant increase. The students 
in Theology have free access to the general library. 

ENGLISH COURSE. 

This course embraces all the studies of the Full Course 
except the Ancient Languages. 

The Full and the English courses of study are alike after the 
Junior year. 

GRADUATION. 

The degree of Bachelor of Divinity is conferred on those 
who complete the Full Course; and a certificate of graduation 
is given to those who complete the English Course. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

These are the same as those in other departments of the 
College. (See Calendar.*) The candidates for admission are 
expected to be present on the first day of the Academic year. 

MINISTERS' INSTITUTE. 

Arrangements have been made for holding a ministers' 
institute two weeks in the Fall term of each year of this Depart- 
ment, under the auspices of the Western Education Society. 

*In8tde first cover. 



^^^^tV 



III,--PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 





♦COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 


CLASSICAL. 


JUNIOR YEAR. 


Fall Term... 


f Latin Grammar — Harkness. 
\ Composition and Rhetoric — Hill. 
1^ English Grammar. 


Winter Term 


( Latin Lesson — Jones. 

^ Elementary Philosophy— Avery. 

1^ Arithmetic. 


Spring Term. . 


f Latin Lessons— e/o>ie5. 
{ Botany — Gray {Bessey.) 
\ Arithmetic. 




MIDDLE YEAR. 


Fall Term. . . 


( CsdSRV— Harkness. 
i Latin Prose Com position-^ J'o^ies. 
1 Greek Grammar—G^oo^wm. , 
1^ Ancient History — Swinton. 


AYinter Term 


f Caesar — Harkness. 

<j Greek Lessons— ^o/^e. 

l^ Roman History — /Swinton. 


Sprins Term. . 


f Cicero — Chase and Stuart. 

<[ Anabasis — Boise. 

{ First Principles of Algebra — Olney. 




SENIOR YEAR. 


Fall Term.... 


f Cicero. 

<( Anabasis — Boise. 

{ University Algebra, Part i. — Olney, 


Winter Term 


( Virgil. 

1 Latin Prose Composition — Jones. 

<{ Anabasis — Boise. 

1 Greek Prose Composition— Jones. 

[ University Algebra, Part 11. — Olney. 


Spring Term. . 


f Virgil. 

<( Greek Prose Composition— J^owe^. 
t Plane Geometry— OZ^e?/. 


*For corresponding College Courses see Pages 4 to 8. 



20 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



PHILOSOPHICAL. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 

Latin or Greek Grammar. 
Fall Term. ... -{ Ancient Wysiovy—Swinton. 

English Grammar — Beed and Kellogg. 

f Latin or Greek Grammar. 
WnrrEK Tbrm. < Roman History — Leighton. 
\ Arithmetic — Robinson. 

Latin or Greek Lessons. 
Spring Term.. { English Grammar — Reed and Kellogg. 
First Principles of Algebra — Olney. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

Caesar or Anabasis. 
Latin Prose Composition — Jones. 
Composition and Rhetoric — Hill. 
University Algebra, Part I. — Olney. 

Caesar or Anabasis. 
Elementary Philosophy — Avery. 
University Algebra, Part 11. — Olney. 

Virgil or Greek Prose Composition. 

Botany — Gray. 

Plane Geometry — Olney. 



Fall Term.. . . 



Wll^TTEK TeRIT. 



Spring Term.. 



SCIENTIFIC. 



Fall Term.. . . 



Winter Term. 



Latin or Greek Grammar. 
Composition and Rhetoric — Hill. 
English Grammar — Reed and Kellogg. 

Latin or Greek Grammar. 
Elementary Philosophy — Avery. 
Arithmetic — Robinson. 



Bpeino Term 



f Latin or G: 
.. < Botany— 6^ 
i^ Arithmetic 



reek Grammar. 
Gray. 

Robinson. 



The class in Part I. Algebra is conducted in the fall and 
winter terms. 

Classes are formed each term in Arithmetic and English 
Grammar. Book-keeping, Penmanship, Elocution, and Free- 
Iland Drawing, are taught each term in other departments. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT- 



21 



NOEMAL COUESE. 



Fall Tirm.... 



TViNTER Term. 



Spring ^Derm. . 



Fall Term. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Grammar and Analysis. 

Arithmetic, with Metric System — Bobinson. 

Lectures on Teaching. 

Physical Geog-raphy (one-half term.) 

Reading and Orthography (one-halt term.) 

Arithmetic completed. 
Grammar and Analysis. 
Elementary Philosophy — Avery. 
Vocal Music. 

Moral Philosophy. 

Grammar and Analysis. 

Botany. 

Free-Hand Drawing. 

First Principles of Algebt*a— O^ne^^. 

SECOND YEAR. 

( Elementary Chemistry. 

I University Algebra, Part I. — Olney^ 

I Composition and Rhetoric. 

[ Anatomy, Physiology and Hygiene. 



Winter Term. 



Spring Term . , 



Political Economy. 

University Algebra, Part l\.-—Olney. 

Zoolog}^ or General History. 

Penmanship. 

Civil Government. 
Geometry (plane) — Olney. 
Geology or Philology. 
\^ Penmanship. 

This course is intended to be thoroughly' practical and to 
put within the reach of all who desire to become teachers, in a 
compact form, the best foundation of facts and discipline attain- 
able in two years of work. At least two terms must be spent in 
the Institution to secure a diploma. 



^^^^^^ 



IV.-COMMERCIAL AND TELEGRAPHIC 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

To those seekiuiJ: a Commercial education unequalod advan- 
ta*re8 are now offered. No other first-class school in the United 
States presents to the public a better course of study, or tuition, 
board, and other incidental expenses at rates so low. 

Preparation. — A fair knowledge of the common Enji-lish 
branches is required to enter either the Commercial or Tele- 
graphic course. 

Time to £7/1 ^er.— Students can enter at any time. 

Length of Timie Required. — The Commercial course can, in 
some cases, be completed in three months, but most students 
should spend from four to five months in study and practice' 
The Telegraphic course requires from five to eight months. 

Z)ip/om«5are awarded to graduates 

Vacations. — There will be a vacation during the sumrner 
months corresponding to tliat of the College proper, but classes 
in this Department will not be interrupted by the short vaca- 
tions between the terms. 

J'w^Y^■o7i— Payable in advance, at the office of the Depart- 
ment, by purchase of Scholarships or Admission Cards. 

Scholarship for Commercial course, giving the holder the privil- 
ege of completing the course at pleasure, and reviewing with- 
out charge, including Business Penmanship . $30 00 

• Telegraphic course, Theoretical and Practical ( sound ) 35 00 

Joint Commercial and Telegraphic Scholarships ( sound ) 55 00 

Penmanship and Telegraphic Book-keeping free to Tele- 
graphic students one hour per day during the course. 

Students entering tor the Commercial, or Telegraphic course 
are required to pay a Matriculation Fee of one dollar, and 
Library and Reading-room tax of 50 cents for gentlemen, and 25 
cents for ladies. 

PENMANSTIIP. 

Twenty lessons ( one hour each ) $ 2 00 

Forty lessons ( one hour each ) 3 50 

Sixty lessons— twelve weeks — (one hour each) 5 00 

One month ( constant i)ractice ) 6 00 

Two months ( <-onHtant practice ) 10 00 

Teachers' course in Practical ( time unlimited ) 15 00 

Course; in Ornamental 20 00 

Commercial course and Teachers' course in Practical Penman- 
ship ( both ScholarsliipH for unlimited time ) 40 00 

[Scholarships are not transferable.] 



COMMERCIAL & TELEGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT. ^3 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

For the Commercial course, from $10 to $12; Telegraphic 
course, from $1 to $1.50. . 

Assistancie.—T arsons whose circumstp.nces require can usually 
obtaiu employment at manual labor to partly pay ext)enses while 
studying. 

As tar as practicable, students are aided in securing perma- 
nent situations upon graduation. 

The Cominercial Course embraces Commercial Law, Political 
Economy, Book-keeping, Penmanship, Commercial Arithmetic* 

Book-keeping, as studied in connection with the course^ 
exhibits the, entire process of opening, conducting and closing 
about forty sets of Stock and Partnership books, with the most 
approved forms for keeping accounts by Single and Double 
Entry, in th*^ various departments of trade. 

In working these sets the student msikes out his Journal — in 
most of the sets, Day-book also, and posts to his Ledger, keep- 
ing all the auxiliary books, and writing out every kind of Com 
mercial paper, including Contracts, Promissory Notes, Checks, 
Bills of Exchange, Drafts, Orders, Receipts, Due-bills, Accounts 
Current, Account Sales, Bills of Parcels, Invoices, and Bills of 
Lading. 

Among the kinds of business which the practice in Book- 
keeping comprises, are Wholesale and Retail Merchandising, 
Commission, Compound Company and Joint Stock Business, 
Bankinsf, Steamboating, Railroading, Manufacturing, Jobbing, 
Brokerage, and Exchange. 

Instruction is given orally to classes and to individuals 
separately, and their work criticised and corrected. • 

The Course is divided into three divisions, as follows : — 



Day-book; 

Journal ; 

Ledger ; 

Trial Balance ; 

Analysis ; 

Commercial Law — Clark ; 

SECOND DIVISION. 



FIRST DIVISION. 

Connneacial Paper ; 
Commercial Arithmetic — 

Sadler ; 
Penmanship ; 
Political Economy — Perry. 



Full Journal ; 
Cash Book ; 

Special Column Journal ; 
Commission Sales Book ; 
Executors' and Administrators' 
Accounts; 



Changing Sets of Stock Books 
from Single to Double 
Entry; 

Changing Sets of Partner- 
ship Books from Single to 
Double Entry. 



24 COMMERCIAL & TELEGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT. 



Consignments ; 

Changing Sets oi Stock and 

Partnership Books from 

Double to Single Entry ; 
Consignments ; 
Shipments ; 

THIRD DIVISION. 



Commercial Paper ; 
Correspondence ; 
Commercial Law ; 
Political Economy ; 
Commercial Arithmetic ; 
Penmanship. 



Compound Company Accounts, 

Half System ; 
Compound Company Accounts, 

Whole System ; 
Railroading; 
Steamboating ; 
Banking ; 



Brokerage; 
Life Insurance ; 
Fire Insurance; 
Penmanship ; 
Commercial Arithmetic ; 
Political Eeonomy ; 
Commercial Law. 



TELEGRAPHY 



Practical Telegraphy is taught by the Principal — a sound 
operator — aided by practical assistants. 

Facilities. — The telegraphic apparatus is very large, embrac- 
ing every kind of instrument in use on the lines in this country, 
in connection with which there is a good collection of electrical 
instruments quite sufficient to fully illustrate every principle of 
electricity which would in anywise interest or benefit the student 
o^ Telegiaphy. In the practice, students are drilled first on 
short circuits confined to the College line, then upon the College 
line, extending through the city, having separate offices, and 
provided with all necessary office supplies, such as blank record 
books, printed message blanks, tariff book, blank reports and 
train order blanks. 

Additional to these facilities advanced students are permitted 
to copy from an actual business circuit, thus becoming accus- 
tomed to the writing and methods of doing business of a large 
body of operators, among whom are some of the best qualified in 
the service. They are enabled to gain a practical experience not 
attainable in any other way. 

THE COURSE 

Is divided into two divisions, and is accompanied by a course of 
Lectures embracing the following subjects : 

Erictional Electricity, Galvanic or Voltaic Electricity, Mag- 
netism, Systems of Telegraphy, Thermal Electricity, In8uIation, 



COMMERCIAL & TELEGRAPHIC DEPARTMENT. 25 



Circuits, Conduction, ^rial Telegraphy, Submarine Telegraphy, 
Telephone, Terrestial Electrical Disturbances. 



Instruments ; 

Writing (Telegraphic) ; 

Receiving ; 

Checking ; 

Receiving ; 

Book-keeping (Telegraphic) ; 

Railroad Business; 



Outline of Theoretical Tele- 
graphy ; 

Messages; 

Penmanship ; 

History and Theory of Tele- 
graph — Prescott ; 

Penmanship. 



GMiirri:N^ hall. 



This elegant structure is devoted exclusively to the purposes 
of this department. No other school in the West enjoys so 
pleasant and commodious apartments as are thus permanently 
provided for the Commercial and Telegraphic Department of 
Hillsdale College. 




V.-MUSIC DEPARTMENT 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

By authority of the Board of Trustees, a new graded course 
of study has been arranged. The College will grant diplomas to 
all such as may complete it in a satisfactory manner. 

The following is an outline ot the course of study for the 

PIANOFORTE. 

FIRST GRADE. 

Emery, op. 35. Foundation Studies. 

Loeschhorn, op. 65. Book 1. 

Koehler, op. 151. 

Simple pieces for recreation. 

Technical exercises from Plaidy, Koehler, etc. 

The exercises of this grade are devoted mainly to the 
acquirement ot a pure legato touch, with developnjent of the 
wrist sufficient to secure a proper execution of the simpler rondo 
forms, and smaller pieces for recreation. The flnjicring of mnjor 
scales is to be learned, with practice in the mo t common major 
keys. 

SECOND GRADE. 

Kunz, op. 14. Two part canons. 

Koehler, op. 50. 

Loeschhorn, op. 65. Books 2 and 3. 

Czerny, op. 636. 

Mathews. Studies in Phrasing co7nmenced. 

Sonatinas by Clementi, Kuhlau, Dussek, Lichner, etc. 

In this grade the minor scales are to be learned, and the major 
scales constantly practiced with accents. Arpeggios on major 
and minor common chords are to be studied in two forms, with 
accents. A knowledge of tlxe principal modifications of the 
legato and staccato touch njust be acquired. 

THIRD GRADE. 

Mathews. Pliraslng completed. 

Loeschhorn, op. 66. Books 1, 2 and 3. 

Heller, op. 46. Bool<8 1 and 2. 

Koehler, op. 128. Book 1. 

Heller, op. 45. 

Loeschhorn, op. 165. The Trills. 

Bach. l»n'lu(l(',s. 

Kmci-y, MlcMiciilsof W'AYUxowy, one half . 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 27 

Easier Sonatas of Clcincnti, Haydn, Mczart and Beethoven. 

Sonatas and pieces for four hands by Diabelli and others. 

Reading of Chorals in full score, and Song accompaniment. 

Exercii^es in this grade comprise major and minor scales in 
octaves, sixths and tenths, with accents; also four forms of 
arpeggio, including the chords of the dominant and diminished 
seventh. Different forms of staccato touch are to be practiced 
and special attention will be given to the cantabile style, with 
appropriate selections for illustration. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

Cramer's Etudes, through the grade. 

Loeschhorn, op. 67. Books 1, 2 and 3. 

Heller, op. 16, or Jensen, op. 32. 

Bach. Inventions. 

Kullak, op. 48. Octave School, commenced. 

Emery. Elements of Harmony, completed. 

Anthems and Glees in full score. 

Mendelssohn's Songs without words. 

Sonatas by Mozart and Beethoven. 

Selections from Mendelssohn, Chopin, Schumann, etc. 

Salon pieces in modern style. 

Scales in double thirds and sixths, with practice of octaves 
and trills. 

.Arpeggios in extended positions. 

Reading at sight four hand arrangements of Haydn's Sym- 
phonies, etc. 

FIFTH GRADE. 

Kullak's Octave School, completed. 

Selections from dementi's Gradus ad Parnassum. 

Moscheles, op. 70. 

Chopin, op. 10. 

Selections appropriate to this grade from Beethoven, Men- 
delssohn, ('hopin, Weber, and others. 

Fi-anklin Taylor's " Primer of Pianoforte Playing," for ref- 
ennice, tliroiighuul the course. 

Pauer's Musical Forms and Fillmore's History of Pianoforte 
Music to be read. 

This course provides for steady attainment of technical 
power, cultivation of the aesthetic sense, and gradual advance in 
appieciation of works in polyphonic style. It especially antici- 
pates the needs of those who wish to qualify themselves for 
teaching. Hereafter the names of students will be arranged in 
the grades to which they respectively belong when the catalogue 
is prepared for publication. 



28 MUSIC DEPARTMENT. 

A course of study in Voice Culture will be offered, as soon 
as a permanent teacher can be secured for that department. 

Those who are qualified for the study of Oratorios, Masses, and 
the higher grades of Glee and Church Music, find in the rehearsals 
of the Beethoven Society opportunity for constant improvement. 



: 



TUITION. 

r PAYABLE IN ADVANCE.] 
For Private Lessons, Piano or Cabinet Organ — 

Ten weeks ( twenty lessons ) $13 00 

Ten weeks ( ten lessons) 6 50 

For Harmony, in class of four to six — 

Ten weeks (twenty lessons ) 5 00 

For Elementary or Advanced Singing Class — 

Five weeks (twenty lessons )• 1 00 

For use of Piano, one hour daily, per term 3 00 

For use of Piano, two hours daily, per term 5 00 

No deduction can be made for lessons missed by pupils, 
except by special arrangement. . 




VI.--ART DEPARTMENT. 



In accoixiance with a reisolution passed by the Board ot 
Trustees at their last annual meeting, a course ot* instruction in 
Art, consisting of four yeai^' study, has been arranged. The 
satisfactory completion ot this course will entitle the student to 
a diploma. 

The design is to make the^rs^ ye<ir of the course thoroughly 
practical, in order to meet the demand for teachers in drawing 
and perspective in the public schools of our country, and to lay 
a solid foundation for those who intend to enter the professions 
ot engineering, architecture, designing etc. Certificates will be 
given to those students who satisfactorily complete this part of 
the Art Course. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



FIRST YEAR, 

Fall Term. — Elementary principles of Drawing and Per- 
spective, 

"Winter Term, — Drawing from objects, casts, and nature ; 
Perspective continued to oblique. 

Spring Term.— Drawing and Sketching from nature and life ; 
oblique perspective. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Sketching in Pencil, Charcoal and Crayon, India Ink and 
"Water Color ; Painting. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Oil Painting fr©m original studies and from nature; Char- 
coal Drawing, Crayon Studies; Sketching from life and nature. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Oil Painting from life and nature exclusively ; Charcoal and 
Crayon Studies continued; Sketching in Colors; Lectures on 
Art and Artists. 

A good English education is necessary to those pursuing 
this course of study, and after beginning this work it is very 



30 



ART DEPARTMENT. 



important for them to study Latin, some of the modern languages, 
botany, geology, chemistry, z)ology, mineralogy, anatomy, and 
the history of ancient and modern art. 

Energetic and strong students who devote their whole time 
to the work, may complete the studies of the two first years in one- 

The expenses for instruction is about one hundred dollars 
per year, except the first year, which is free to all matriculated 
students who have scholarships. Candidates for advanced stand- 
ing will be examined in all the studies preceding the year which 
they wish to enter, and they may enter the course at any time. 

The students in this Department are under the same rules as 
those who are in other departments of the Institution, and they 
share the same privileges. 

TUITION. 

[Payable in Advance.] 

Oil Painting (twenty lessons) f 12 00 

Water Colors ( twenty lessons ) 12 00 

Crayon ( black or in colors) 12 00 

Higher Drawing and Perspective ( twenty lessons ) 8 00 

Same ia Class for College Term (not College students ) 8 00 

The new Art Gallery and Studio, in Fine Arts Hall, is now 
occupied, and offers advantages to art students superior to any 
enjoyed since the founding of an Art Department in connection 
with this Institution. 

Funds are much needed, and earnestly solicited, to add to 
the pictures already in the gallery, as well as to provide casts* 
manikins and other appliances of an art school. 

The mere mention of the instructor's name gives to artists 
and art students an assurance of high culture in this Department. 
Others will find in his numerous pictures in the various states, 
and the high rank taken in art exhibitions by his works, a suffi- 
cient pledge of tWe superior talent engaged. The highest tribute 
that can be paid to the efficiency of this Department is tound in 
the expression of the hundreds who have been connected with 
the Art School and in the large number of professional artists 
who have here received their training. Professor Gardner will 
cheerfully answer correspondence for further information. 



-^-^^m^ 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



LOCATION AND COMMUNICATION. 

HILLSDALE, the seat of Hillsdale College, is a flourishing city in 
Southern Michigan, easily accessible from all parts of the country, by means of 
the Lake Shore &■ Michigan Southern Railroad and its divisions. By the main 
line, it is one hundred and eighty miles east ot Chicago and sixty- five west of 
Toledo; by the Ypsilanti division, eighty miles southwest of Detroit; by the 
Lansing division, sixty-five miles south of Lansing ; by the Ft. Wayne & Jack- 
son division, eighty miles north of Ft. Wayne and thirty miles south of Jackson. 
The trains on the first two divisions are made up in Hillsdale, while those on 
the third enter the city. By a special arrangement, students of the College 
are allowed a reduction of one-third fare when returning to their homes for 
vacations. 

The College buildings are located on College Hill, and command an im- 
posing view of the city and a broad surrounding country, including a chain of 
beautiful lakes. 

The Western Union Telegraph Company has an office in Griffin Hall and 
the Mutual Union has one in the business part of the city. A Telephone in- 
strument in the Treasurer's oflSce connects the College with one hundred and 
thirty-three cities and villages. 

PAST ATTENDANCE. 
The College has graduated four hundred and ninety- seven from its four- 
year courses; has instructed over thirteen thousand, and averaged over five 
hundred yearly attendance during its entire history. 
ADMISSION. 
Candidates must bring testimonials of good character, and those from 
other institutions must present certificates of honorable dismission. None will 
be received under fourteen years of age, except by special arrangement. The 
candidate will first apply to the President, at No. IX. College Hall, where he 
will be given all the information necessary for entering the College. 

If assistance is desired in obtaining rooms and board, report to the Treas- 
urer of the College, first floor center building. 

DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS. 
The Degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred upon graduates of the Class- 
ical Course ; Bachelor of Philosophy ui^on graduates of the Philosophical 
Course ; Bachelor of Science upon graduates of the Scientific Course ; Bachelor 
of Divinity upon graduates of the Full Course in Theology. 

Upon Bachelors of Art, of Philosophy, and of Science, of one year's post 
graduate residence and study, and upon those of three years standing and good 
moral character, the respective Masters Degrees are conferred. 

Diplomas are given to those who complete the English, Theological, Com- 
mercial, and the Normal courses. 

CLASS RECORD AND DEPORTMENT. 
A record is kept of each student's attainments in recitation and examina- 
tion, and of his delinquencies. Information concerning the progress and deport- 
ment of any student is, upon his request, sent to his parents or guardian. 



32 GENERAL INFORMATION. 

RELIGIOUS EXERCISES. 

All s-tudents are required to attend the Chapel exercises daily, and pnblic 
religions services on the Sabbath at the College Church, or at such other churches 
as nmy t>e selected by parents or students at the opening of the term. 

The College Prayer Meeting, for Faculty and Students, on Tuesday evening, 
is largely attended and is a source of much good and the scene of many con- 
versions. 

LECTURES. 

Lectures on methods of Study, Deportment and other important subjects 
are delivered in the Chapel, which all are expected to attend. The Lady Prin- 
cipal delivers lectures expressly prepared for the ladies. 

The lectures in one department are open to students in all otbersv 
LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM. 

The Library, numbering about seven thousand volumes, exclusive of 
pamphlets and unbound books, is open daily, except Sunday. It contains a 
well-sustained Reading-room, which is supplied with the best American and 
foreign current literature. 

APPARATUS, LABORATORIES AND MUSEUM. 

All departments are supplied with suitable apparatus which, in Chemistry, 
Physiology, Astronomy, Surveying and like branches, is placed in the hands of 
students with instructions for practice, thus securing the most satisfactory and 
lasting results in these studies. 

Instruction requiring illustrations is given in amphitheaters which afford 
the clearest views of charts, demonstrations and experiments. 

The Museum is moderately complete, and is steadily growing. Its contents 
are daily used in the class-room, its study being a required part of the scientfic 
work. Laboratory Practice in Chemistry, Dissecting in Comparative Anatomy, 
and the preparation of Herbaria in Botany are taught. 

EXPENSES. 

College Fees — 

Tuition, to those having scholarships Free 

Scholarship Rental, per term from 50 cts. to $1 00 

Incidentals, per term ( gentlemen ) 3 50 

Incidentals, per term ( ladies) 2 25 

Matriculation ( paid but once ) 3 00 

BoxKi). — The chief item of collegiate expense is obviously board. The 
statement that, in the fall of 18SI, board in eleven boarding-houses and clubs 
a^'cM'ag' d ijil.SO per week, furnishes ground for a fair estimate for the present- 
In the absence of such reports for 1883, due allowance may be made for the 
'jr(Mu-\-d] rise in prices of provision from the fact that the experience of the 
Coi.lfoe Club for the fall of 1883 was ^2.1 5 per week. It may be further said 
tliat board, with room, fuel and lights, coupled with the social advantages of 
lirst-clasrt families, is furnished for from -f 3.25 to $4. 

Rooms.— Rooms are rented either «//(./;///, h/ilf furnished (with stove, bed- 
stead, waslistand, table and chairs), or fiilU/ furnisfu'd and cared for. Empty 
rofMUH can f>e scfMired for 25 cents a week, one person (50 cents a room ), and 
upward. Half furnished rooms from 25 c(;ntH to 40 cents, (50 cents tv) 80 cents 
a room ;, and njiwards. Students who wish to economize should hire such 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 33 

rooms and bring: a mattress, bedding, and carpet if desired. Fully, furnished 
and cared for rooms can be secured for from 75 cents to 40 cents, i. e., $1.50 to 
80 cents per room. Rooms furnished with a cookiiij;- stove for self-boarding 
can be secured. 

Gentlemen can secure one-half joint use of rooms, in Griffin Hall, at the 
following rates per week. The first thirteen rooms are up one flight of stairs ; 
the remaining fourteen, two flights : 

No. 1, faces E., 35c. per person ; No. 2, S. and E., 40c.; No. 3, S", 40c.; No. 
4. S. and W., 40c.; No. 5, W., 35c.; Nos. 6 and 7, W., 35c.; No. 8, W., 35c.; No. 
9. N. and W., 35c.; No. 10, N., 30c.; No. 11, N. and E., 35c.; No, 12, E., 35c.: 
No. 13, E., 35c.\ No. 14, E., 30c.;. No. 15, E., 30c.; No. 16, E. and S., 35c.; No. 
17, S., 30c.; No. 18. S. and W., 35c ; No. 19, W., 30c.; No. 20. W., 30c.; No. 
21, W., 30c.; No. 22, W., 30c.; No. 23, W- and N., 30c.; No. 24, N., 25c.; No. 25, 
E. and N., 30c. ; No. 26, E., 30c.; No. 27, E., 30c. 

All rooms are supplied with gas, which may be used or not. When used, 
each student pays $2 per term extra. 

Eight of the rooms are single ( square rooms ), supplied with movable 
wardrobes. The remaining nineteen rooms are double, comprising each a pri 
vate hall, 3x9 ; a bed-room, 7)^x9 ; and a study-parlor, 103^x1 03^. 

Each room contains a stove, table, bedstead, spring bed, washstand and 
chairs 

Ladies rent rooms in East FTall, each occupant paying as follows, per term: 

On second floor, No. 12, facing E. and S., 13, E., 24, 25, 26, S , $5; 14, E., $4. 
On third floor, 28, 42, 43, 41, S., 3), E , 29, E. and S., $4; 31, 32, 33, E., $S 50. 

These rooms are furnished with carpets, stoves, tables, bedsteads and chairs, 
with closets and adjoining rooms for baggage and fuel. Thay are 14x103^ feet. 

Ladies, not residents of the city, are required to secure rooms in the CoUesse, 
except by special permission from the Lady Principal. 

Yea-KLy Expenses —The average expenses for 1880-81, as reported by a 
large number, taken at random, was $161.12, including board, room rent, col- 
lege fees, fuel, lights, washing, text-books, and an average of $15.62 for rail- 
road fare. In this average are included both liberal and strict modes of living. 
Nearly one-third report their expenses at from $90 to $110. Though no such 
reports have been taken in 1883, the above will form a basis for a just estimate 
in the light of such changes in the cost of living as have been experienced by 
the country in general. 

SOCIETIES, ETC. 

The gentlemen have three well sustained literary societies— the Amphictyon, 
Alpha Kappa Phi, and the Tneadelphic. The ladies have two— the Ladies, 
Literary Union, and the Germaute Sodales. These societies liave separate halls 
finished with rare elegance. 

The Beethoven Society affords excellent opportunities for practice in sing- 
ing, and has a hall suited to its purposes. 

A branch of the Young Men's Christian Association is sustained in the 
College, and has a hall in which it conducts the weekly prayer meetings. 

A weekly College newspaper ( The Hillsdale Herald ) opens its columns 
to undergraduates' communications. 

For further information, letters of inquiry may be addressed to 

C. B. MILLS, SECRETARY. 



SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE. 



Collr<^iatc and Academic Preparatory 528 

Theological , 42 

Commercial and Telegraphic 201 

Music 148 

Art 101 

1020 

Names entered more than once 303 

Total 717 



CALENDAR. 



Terms and Vacations, 1884-5. 

Fall Term begins Wednesday, 3 p. m September 3 

Freshman Examinations, Monday September 8 

Fall Term ends Friday noon November 21 

Winter Term (1884-5) begins Wednesday, 3 p. m. . . .December 3 

Winter Term (1881^5) ends Friday noon February 27 

Spring Term (1885) begins Wednesday, 3 p. m. March 15 



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